How to Get Pet-sitting Insurance

by Lori Corrigan
Liability insurance is imperative for protecting both pet sitter and client against accidental property damage and pet injuries.

Liability insurance is imperative for protecting both pet sitter and client against accidental property damage and pet injuries.

In the armchair with a dog image by Fotoskat from Fotolia.com

Professional pet sitters have insurance needs that are excluded by general liability insurance policies. Without customized insurance to cover those needs, a pet sitter's business is exposed to a set of liability hazards that most people do not routinely encounter. Pet sitters take on the care, custody and control of the property of their clients, including their pets and their homes. By insuring against the wide variety of things that can go wrong where pets and property are involved, you protect your business and your clients. Such insurance also is a sign to your clients of your professionalism. Some pet-sitter associations provide easy access to insurance customized for their members' needs.

Step 1

Contact established pet-sitter associations for information they provide on insurance. Some, including the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters and Pet Sitters International, offer member access to insurance programs customized for their needs. Compare the rates, coverage and deductions offered to the policies offered by other insurance companies.

Step 2

Determine whether you need an individual or a standard liability policy. Pet Sitters International recommends you choose the individual policy if you're the sole proprietor and have no other people working for or with you. Opt for the standard coverage if your company is an S corporation, corporation, limited liability company or partnership.

Step 3

Consult an insurance agent if you're not sure what coverage you need, or how much. An expert can help you consider the variables associated with your specific business, including whether your business is home-based, whether you intend to hire employees, and whether you should have insurance that covers your own needs in the event of injury.

Photo Credits

  • In the armchair with a dog image by Fotoskat from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Based in Arizona, Lori Corrigan is a social media collaborator with more than 25 years of experience in research writing and editing. Her work has appeared in "Ladies' Home Journal," "Woman's Day" and "Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover's Soul," covering topics such as business, psychology, animal welfare and academia.