Safe Ways to Get Rid of Fleas on Puppies

by Michelle Miley

Danielle deLeon

No dog enjoys having fleas, but fleas on puppies can be fatal. Fleas bite an animal and then drink its blood. Puppies do not have that much blood in their bodies because they are so small. This means a flea infestation can cause a puppy to develop anemia and die if left untreated. Although most commercial flea control products contain chemicals that can be harmful to a puppy and cannot be used on young animals, there are some things that you can do to remove fleas from your puppy safely.

Step 1

Check the puppy's gums for signs of anemia. A dog's gums should be pink. If your puppy's gums are pale or white the animal is likely anemic and needs to see a vet immediately. Anemia can kill puppies.

Step 2

Bathe the puppy. Give the puppy a thorough bath in warm water and some mild dish soap. Be very careful not to get soap in the puppy's eyes. Dry the puppy with a clean towel.

Step 3

Comb the puppy. After the puppy is dry, spread the towel on the floor and have the puppy stand on it. Use a flea comb to comb through the puppy's fur. Drop any fleas caught in the comb or that fall into the towel into a container of warm, soapy water to kill them.

Step 4

Wash the puppy's bedding in hot water. Wash the puppy's blankets or towels as well to kill any fleas before they can re-infect the puppy.

Step 5

Keep combing and checking. Comb your puppy with a flea comb and check his bedding daily. If the fleas come back the puppy will need another bath. If the flee problem is severe, you may need to keep treating the fleas by bathing and combing the puppy until he is old enough to be dipped or shampooed in a pesticide shampoo. Then be sure to treat your house and yard for fleas.

Items You Will Need

  • Mild Dish Soap
  • Flea Comb
  • Clean Towel
  • Small Container of Soapy Water

Tips

  • Remember that fleas like to hide in the folds of the skin. When flea combing your puppy, pay special attention to the place where her legs meet her body, the base of her tail and behind her ears.
  • Check and treat other pets. Make sure that the fleas have not spread to any of the other animals in your home. If it has, those animals will need to be treated appropriately for their age and species.

Photo Credits

  • Danielle deLeon

About the Author

Writing professionally since 2008, Michelle Miley specializes in home and garden topics but frequently pens career, style and marketing pieces. Her essays have been used on college entrance exams and she has more than 4,000 publishing credits. She holds an Associate of Applied Science in accounting, having graduated summa cum laude.