Standard Schnauzer

The Standard Schnauzer is a dog breed that originated in Germany in the 15th and 16th centuries. The literal translation is "snouter" from the German word for "snout" and means colloquially "moustache", because of the dog's distinctively bearded snout. Although the schnauzer is considered a terrier-type dog, they do not have the typical terrier temperament.

Generally classified as a working or utility dog, this versatile breed is a robust, squarely built, medium-sized dog with aristocratic bearing. It has been claimed that it was a popular subject of painters Sir Joshua Reynolds, Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt, but actual proof remains elusive.

Standard Schnauzers are either salt-and-pepper or black in color, and are known for exhibiting many of the "ideal" traits of any breed. These include high intelligence, agility, alertness, reliability, strength and endurance. This breed of dog has been very popular in Europe, specifically Germany, where it originated. The breed was first exhibited at a show in Hanover in 1879, and since then has taken top honors in many shows, including the prestigious "Best in Show at Westminster Kennel Club" in the United States in 1997.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Standard Schnauzer", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.